Homeward bound elaine tyler may

There was a problem adding your email address. Marriage and Divorce in Post-Victorian America It is a great irony that in an era of international tension that found its greatest symbol in young schoolchildren crouched, hands behind heads, in school basements in preparation for the coming of Armageddon, America could have had a self-perception of domestic tranquility, itself symbolized by the vapidity of Father Knows Best, Leave It to Beaver, et al. Here, May explores this connection and, by bringing public policy and political ideology to bear on the study of private life, places the family within the larger political culture rather than outside of it.

Homeward bound elaine tyler may

This survey of couples was conducted by University of Michigan psychologist, E. Hopefully not regular reading for the well-educated KLS study members. May tries to use movie plots to make her points about American attitudes. The respondents of the survey were white, predominantly Protestant and well educated.

It seems possible that couples would have shared their responses, thus setting limits on their frankness. Furthermore the children of these couples who were engaged in the thirties were probably older than the baby boom children.

Citing movie plots and Photoplay articles bears witness to virtually nothing.

Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era - Elaine Tyler May - Google Books

Even if May compiled a survey of all popular movies and their treatment of men, women, romance and family, it would be difficult to determine if these movies were popular because they reflected everyday life or because they diverged from the routine and the humdrum.

In my humble opinion, Cinderella had more influence on female illusions than either Joan Crawford or Bette Davis. Both the Depression and the War were crises and the changes to traditional family were involuntary and considered temporary.

The postwar family was not a retreat from previous gains but an attempt to return to normalcy. Marriage and children represent affirmations of confidence in the future not signs of concern, fear and angst. A strong argument can be made that for the couples May describes, domesticity was not tied to containment and bomb shelters but to relief and gratitude and even joy in the ending of World War II.

Domesticity would have been desirable regardless of the international political situation. May reveals in extensive quotes from the KLS and letters to Betty Freidan that marriage to their true Prince Charming did not guarantee women would live happily ever after.

Of course, no one lives happily ever after for many reasons. Many participants in the study realize this and stated their willingness to soldier on and maintain their family. May constantly implies that the world is a better place now that it is common for women to seek a career outside the home.

Homeward bound elaine tyler may

The social problem that May devotes the most time to is unhappy housewives. As we now see, although containment is no longer an issue allied with the traditional family and in my opinion these issues never were aligned those who now support traditional family values are perceived to be the right of the political spectrum and those who support a feminist agenda are perceived to be on the left.

May, Homeward Bound

May does not discuss religion extensively. Religion is crucial in determining attitudes to marriage, child-rearing and morality, including sexual morality which some prefer to believe does not exist.

May discusses consumerism, which presumably equates with materialism and capitalist greed. It is like comparing Photoplay to Foreign Affairs. Fear may have caused the baby boomers to resist the Vietnam War more than the cocoons of their youth. This statement is not completely borne out by the rest of the book.

After reading so many of the extremely personal survey responses about individual husband and wife relationships, the reader feels almost like a voyeur.

May argues that the cause of this quest for domestic security was rooted in Depression-era threats to family. She cites data such as decreases in marriage rates during the 30s to support this claim May makes good use of such demographic data, but one problem in her methodology is reliance on surveys that have clear sampling biases.

She most often quotes the KLS study, and also the Glen Elder study that recorded opinions and data about white, protestant, working and middle class families Additionally, she reinforces an impression that American characterization of homosexual behavior as un-American was a creation of Cold War ideology But despite these issues, Homeward Bound is still an interesting and enlightening perspective on the period.

Family members consciously or unconsciously saw themselves as soldiers in the cold war, with the clearly delineated roles of the husband as the breadwinner, the wife as the homemaker, and both as active consumers The Boomers did not feel the same pressures and did not have the same legacy of immediate, very tangible threats of their parents.

Boomer threats were abstract — the bomb, communist agents, sexual perverts, often referred to but never or rarely seen. She argues that this was a response to the hardships of the Great Depression as well as to the threat of the Cold War.In her introduction, Elaine Tyler May states that the focus of Homeward Bound is the impact of public policy and political ideology on private life, and her story is of how Americans began to view the family as psychological fortress to protect them against internal decay ().

This statement is not completely borne out by the rest of the book. Elaine Tyler May is the Regents Professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota.

She is the author books including America and the Pill, Homeward Bound, and Barren in the Promised Land, which received Honorable Mention for the William J.

Goode Book rutadeltambor.com former president of the American Studies Association and the Organization of American 4/5(39). Elaine Tyler May is the Regents Professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota.

She is the author books including America and the Pill, Homeward Bound, and Barren in the Promised Land, which received Honorable Mention for the William J.

Goode Book Award/5(2). Elaine Tyler May opened her book, Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era, with a description of a publicity stunt. A young couple, recently married, chooses to spend their honeymoon in a bomb shelter.4/4(40).

Title: Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era. Author: Elaine Tyler May. Elaine Tyler May traces the rise of a powerful ideology of domesticity and the home in the post-war years that was directly linked to the geopolitical ideology of the Cold War.

Elaine Tyler May is the Regents Professor in the Departments of American Studies and History at the University of Minnesota. She is the author books including America and the Pill, Homeward Bound, and Barren in the Promised Land, which received Honorable Mention for the William J. Goode Book Award/5(2).

May, Homeward Bound